Work / Life Balance – Are You in Control?

Do you have balance in your life? Do you work too much or play too hard? Is it simply a matter of choosing between the different dimensions of your life? Making that "either / or" choice and calling it balanced? When you think about the dimensions of your life, do you think of the different roles that you must play in life? More often than not, we think of ways to separate our roles, employee at work, mommy and daddy at home, community activist or Little League coach in the community. The funny part about this is that all of these roles represent who we are. Our roles grow out of our values, principles and life missions and become the channels through which we live, love, learn and leave a nationality.
So what's the answer to achieving the balance we seek? According to many of my clients and most people "time" – or lack of it – is the main culprit: "If only I had more time, I could do everything and put my life into a perfect balance." While time management can be a serious issue, it does not have to be a barrier to happiness. Not putting the effort and commitment into establishing a clear path to your mission, vision and values ​​are greater obstacles. The issue is not balance; it's establishing priorities. Priorities do not bring perfection into your life but they do help you to gain better control over life's issues.

George Bernard Shaw wrote, "If you take too long in deciding what to do with your life, you'll find you've done it."

What can you do differently to begin to establish your priorities around your personal values ​​to feel satisfied at home and at work? Try these exercises to focus your career planning and life thinking – yes, you have to do the work to get to your goal!

1. Write down your ten favorite activities, the ones without which your life would feel robbed. Does your career choice allow you to do your favorite activities on a regular basis?

2. Write down the top five goals you want to accomplish in your career. (Think money, fame, impact, contribution and more.) Your selected career must enable you to reach these goals.

3. List everything you'd like to do in your lifetime. These lists can run several hundred items. Does your chosen career choice allow for the accomplishment of your dreams or are you just dreaming?

You are the steward over your time, talent and resources. Now is the time to begin to balance between your inner life and your outer desires. Synergy or balance comes when living, loving, learning and leaving a legacy grows together.

Mom and Dad Can Still Travel – Seven Tips to Help Get Them Back on the Road Again

Are your parents reluctant to travel because they just don’t get around like they used to? Well they’re not alone. According to a 2012 US Census report roughly 30.6 million people have difficulty walking or climbing stairs, or use a wheelchair, cane, crutches or walker. Furthermore, nearly 40 percent of people over 65 have at least one disability, according to the US Census Bureau.

But that doesn’t mean travel is out of the question for these folks. In this day and age, with a little advance planning and consumer education, people are able to travel no matter what their disability. Additionally, many travel agencies now provide accessible travel products and services; and as Baby Boomers continue to age, more and more companies are jumping on the access bandwagon. With that in mind, here are some tips to help folks with mobility issues get back on the road — or in the air or on the sea — again.

  • Even if you can walk, reserve an airport wheelchair if you tire easily. Some airports are huge and you could easily put on several miles while in transit, and then arrive at your destination exhausted.
  • You are not required to remove your shoes at the airport security checkpoint if you are physically unable to do so. Just tell the Transportation Security Administration agent that you can’t, and they will hand wand you and swab your shoes for explosive residue.
  • If you need wheelchair accessible transportation from the airport to your hotel, choose a hotel that has a free airport shuttle. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, if the hotel provides free transfers, they must also provide free accessible transfers, even if they have to contract out the service.
  • Cruises are a great accessible vacation choice, but new cruise ships are huge and it can be very tiring to walk from one end to the other. If fatigue is a factor, rent an electric scooter and have it delivered directly to your stateroom. Check with the cruise line for their approved vendors.
  • If you drive to the port, remember that parking is free at all Florida cruise ship piers for cruise passengers who have permanent accessibility modifications installed on their vehicles.
  • In Europe, remember the first floor is not at street level, so if you want a room at street level, ask for a room on the ground floor. Many small European hotels only have stairway access to the first floor.
  • Don’t forget to pack your accessible parking placard with you whenever you travel. It’s good everywhere in the US (except for New York City), Canada and Europe.

Finally, encourage your parents to do extensive pre-trip research, and expand their horizons. There really are a lot of accessible offerings out there and the internet is a great place to find updated access information.

Learn Japanese – Your First Trip to Japan

Learn Japanese easily! When you first visit Japan, people will probably ask you if you’ve been there before. You’ll want to tell them, “It’s my first visit to Japan.” You’ll also want to be able to ask others whether they have visited Japan before. Once you get past this step, it’s critical that you know whether to use formal or informal Japanese. And, you’ve got to use them both correctly. This Beginner Japanese article teaches you how to use hajimete (“for the first time”) and other important words you’ll use when you talk about your first trip to Japan. You’ll also find an indispensable review of Japanese formal and informal speech and an explanation of when to use each one. Don’t miss the awesome chart and practice sentences in this Beginner Japanese article!

Vocabulary: In this article, you’ll learn the following words and phrases:

moo - “already” (adverb)

tsuku - “to arrive at, to reach” (verb 1)

okiru - “to wake up, to get up” (verb 2)

yoku - “well, very”

tsukareru - “to get tired” (verb 2)

sama - (pol) “Mr.” or “Mrs.”

aruku - “to walk” (verb 1)

hajimete - “for the first time”

nikkei - “Japanese descent”

Burajiru - “Brazil”

umareru - “to be born” (verb 2)

sodatsu - “to be raised” (verb 1)

mago - “grandchild”

Jitsu wa – “the truth is, actually”

Grammar: In this article, you’ll learn the following words and phrases:

Useful Vocabulary and Phrases

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yoku

“well”


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Yoku is the adverbial form of the adjective yoi or ii (“good”), and it means “well, nicely, properly,” or “often.”

*For more information on adverbial form see Nihongo Doojoo: Beginner Series Season 4 Article 5

For Example:

  1. Yoku dekimashita.
    “Well done!”
    Literal translation: “Could do well.”
  2. Yoku tabemashita.
    “( I ) ate a lot.”
    Literal translation: “Ate well.”

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nikkei

“Japanese descent”


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The first Chinese character means “sun, day,” or “Japan.” The second Chinese character means “lineage, system,” or “group.” When the name of a country follows, it refers descent. However, it is nikkei that describes Japanese descent, not nihon-kei.

  1. Correct: nikkei Burajiru-jin
  2. Incorrect: nihonkei Burajiru-jin

For Example:

  1. Nikkei peruu-jin
    “Japanese Peruvian”
  2. Mekishiko kei amerika-jin
    “Mexican American”
  3. Furansu kei kanada-jin
    “French Canadian”

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umareru – “to be born”

sodatsu – “to be raised, to grow up”

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The particle de follows the place one was born or raised. Check the usage in the examples.

For Example:

  1. “I was born in Mexico.”
    (Watashi wa) Mekishiko de umaremashita.
  2. “I grew up in France.”
    (Watashi wa) Furansu de sodachimashita.
  3. “I was born and raised in Japan.”
    (Watashi wa) Nihon de umarete, nihon de sodachimashita.
    (Watashi wa) Nihon de umarete, sodachimashita.

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hajimete

“for the first time, first time”


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Hajimete is an adverb, so we generally use it with a verb. However, to mention that it is one’s first time experiencing something, we use the sentence structure “[ noun ] wa hajimete desu.”

For Example:

  1. (Watashi wa) hajimete nihon ni kimashita.
    “I came to Japan for the first time.”
  2. Nihon wa hajimete desu.
    “It’s my first time in Japan.”
  3. Nihon wa hajimete desu ka.
    “Is it your first time in Japan?”

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Grammar Review

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In this article, we are going to learn more about formal and informal speech by reviewing the past tense of a verb.

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“I’m tired.”

Formal:
Tsukaremashita.

Informal:
Tsukareta.

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How to create the formal past form of a verb:

  1. Change the verb into its corresponding -masu form.
  2. Drop -masu and add -mashita.

For more information see Nihongo Doojoo: Newbie Series Style You and Beyond Article 23

For Example:

Dictionary Form / -masu Form / Formal Past Form

aruku / arukimasu / arukimashita

neru / nemasu / nemashita

How to create the informal past form of a verb

  1. Change the verb into its corresponding -te form.
  2. Drop -te and add -ta.

For more information see Nihongo Doojoo: Beginner Series Article 24

For Example:

Dictionary Form / -te Form / Informal Past Form (-ta form)

aruku / aruite / aruita

sodatsu / sodatte / sodatta

okiru / okite / okita

neru / nete / neta

umareru / umarete / umareta

suru / shite / shita

kuru / kite / kita

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Review:

Please rewrite the sentences in informal form.


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  1. Watashi wa Burajiru de umaremashita.
    ___________________________________________________________________
  2. Watashi wa Burajiru de sodachimashita.
    ___________________________________________________________________
  3. Kyoo wa yoku arukimashita yo.
    ___________________________________________________________________
  4. Nihon ni hajimete kimashita.
    ___________________________________________________________________

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Please rewrite the sentences in formal form.

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  1. Kamakura ni itta.
    ____________________________________________________________________
  2. Yoku, neta.
    ____________________________________________________________________
  3. Kinoo nani shita?
    ____________________________________________________________________